Genealogy

GENEALOGY

People sometimes ask me whether we have any movie stars, sports stars, or other celebrities in our 1960 class, and I have to say that I don't think we do. However, one of our classmates can point to a number of "especially interesting people" in his own family. Here's something to inspire all of you genealogy buffs:

 

Jack Brigham writes, "I have been interested in our Brigham family history/ genealogy for many years and have put together a 'book' of my research findings ... about 180 pages long." Jack's history covers 16 family lines for five generations focusing closely on the Brigham line. In a section called “especially interesting people,” Jack describes his family's links to the 14th-century King Edward III of England, Mary Boleyn ("mistress of kings" and sister of Anne Boleyn - 2nd wife of Henry VIII), Stephen Bachiler (a Puritan pastor and religious maverick), three ancestors who came over on the Mayflower in 1620 including Pilgrim William Brewster (whom we read about long ago in US history class), Quakers who supported victims of the Salem Witch Trials, plus many more interesting characters. 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e2/King_Edward_III_%28retouched%29.jpg/220px-King_Edward_III_%28retouched%29.jpg 

Jack's ancestors, King Edward III of England (1327-1377) and William Brewster of Plymouth, Massachusetts (1560-1644)

 

Jack's chronicle includes pedigree charts of family lines, maps, and tables that place his ancestors within the context of historical events in England and in the American colonies. There are lots of photographs of Jack and his sister and brothers growing up in Montclair. He also uses photos and stories to document the family life of his mother and father as young people. Lists of sources and a bibliography are included.  Jack's next step on this "work in progress" will trace even more of his 1700 direct ancestors, going even farther back to those alive in the 1300s and earlier. If you are curious and want to take a look at Jack's history, the url below should enable you to see and download the whole “book.”

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/19QjzEyE7ufqs4AXHSquIsuasUW5q28ag/view?usp=sharing

 

Here are Jack's instructions: To access, click on the url above to get to it in Google Docs. Then click on the download button on the upper right (down arrow) so it will download. When it finishes downloading (you can check via the spinning circle at the bottom of page 1), it may say, “Whoops! There was a problem downloading more pages.”  Ignore that message and click on the box with the Word logo in the lower left corner of the screen. Mine says in that box, “Draft 4 Digital-5a … docx”. Your system might say something slightly different. That should download it into Word and then you can Save it. If this doesn’t work for you, you can contact Jack at brigham@psy.fsu.edu. 

 

A final word from Jack: "I might mention, for any newbie genealogy wannabes, research is so much easier today than it was in the 1980s or 1990s. As in so many things, the internet has had a huge impact. Today, if you have the name and birth year of an ancestor born before 1900 or so, you can simply type it into Google and often it sends you to one or more genealogy websites that have that information on this person and often on her/his ancestors as well." 

 

Jack's ancestors, King Edward III of England (1327-1377) and William Brewster of Plymouth, Massachusetts (1560-1644)

 

Jack's chronicle includes pedigree charts of family lines, maps, and tables that place his ancestors within the context of historical events in England and in the American colonies. There are lots of photographs of Jack and his sister and brothers growing up in Montclair. He also uses photos and stories to document the family life of his mother and father as young people. Lists of sources and a bibliography are included.  Jack's next step on this "work in progress" will trace even more of his 1700 direct ancestors, going even farther back to those alive in the 1300s and earlier. If you are curious and want to take a look at Jack's history, the url below should enable you to see and download the whole “book.”

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/19QjzEyE7ufqs4AXHSquIsuasUW5q28ag/view?usp=sharing

 

Here are Jack's instructions: To access, click on the url above to get to it in Google Docs. Then click on the download button on the upper right (down arrow) so it will download. When it finishes downloading (you can check via the spinning circle at the bottom of page 1), it may say, “Whoops! There was a problem downloading more pages.”  Ignore that message and click on the box with the Word logo in the lower left corner of the screen. Mine says in that box, “Draft 4 Digital-5a … docx”. Your system might say something slightly different. That should download it into Word and then you can Save it. If this doesn’t work for you, you can contact Jack at brigham@psy.fsu.edu. 

 

A final word from Jack: "I might mention, for any newbie genealogy wannabes, research is so much easier today than it was in the 1980s or 1990s. As in so many things, the internet has had a huge impact. Today, if you have the name and birth year of an ancestor born before 1900 or so, you can simply type it into Google and often it sends you to one or more genealogy websites that have that information on this person and often on her/his ancestors as well." 

 

 

Ralph Davidson's Story

In our last MHS '60 update, Jack Brigham wrote about his ambitious geneology project and the stories that he has discovered about his ancestors.  (See Jack's story farther down on this page.) Now Ralph Davidson is sharing his story.

Ralph writes, "I have been into genealogy and family history since retirement 11 years ago. I have written hundreds of pages for my family and others. A lot of great stories. Elizabeth (Libbie) Bacon Custer (wife of General Armstrong Custer) is my one claim to 'celebrity fame.' 

An online website says, "George and Libbie Custer made a handsome and glamorous couple."

 

I researched an ancestor from the American Revolution.  I succeeded in gathering all the evidence needed for proving to the DAR our family descendency (from one 'Eljah Ward') to make it possible for for my sisters, 1st cousin, and female children of all to be eligible.  My sister, Joan, is now in a very large DAR chapter in the Philadelphia area.

My approach to studying family history is different from what others often do.  There are those who go after large amounts of data in order to find as many people as possible.  They like elaborate trees and lists.  My goal is to dig for interesting stories.  I frequently use lineage lines in my writings but not large trees.  Readers understand much better about their ancestry with this approach.  My goal is to make history interesting.